tltweek105

Once there was a yak-herder, who lived in a small hut the loneliest part of the steppe, where there was nothing but wild grass and cold wind for company.

One day, there came out of the mist a princess, riding on a grey-flanked pony, robed in fur and silk, whose eyes were like black moons and whose smile was like the dawn.

“I have no lodgings, no gifts, for one such as you,” he said, but she stayed with him through the night, laughing by the fire and drinking yak’s milk amongst the stench and the cold.


This for Three Line Tales. Thanks to Sonya for running the challenge and Jacco Rienks for providing the prompt photo!

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Day after day, the woodsmen came with axe and cart. With booming laughs and thundering strokes, they cut down trees that had grown for centuries and knew all the secret whisperings of the wind.

Their wives could feel the fury of the woods in the quiet of the night, like a storm ready to break, and they begged the woodsmen to be content and fell trees no more. The woodsmen laughed.

And one day, they did not come home from the woods. Their wives came searching, but found only the tangles of roots and branches and wild thorns.


Word Count: 98

This is for Friday Fictioneers. Thanks to Rochelle Wisoff-Fields for running the challenge and providing the prompt photo!

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“From beneath the giant’s gaze,” the girl boasted, “I stole his cattle. From the king’s halls, I stole his drinking horn. There is nothing I cannot bring it to you.”

“The Sun,” her love replied. “Bring me the Sun.”

And so the girl crossed the circling ocean and climbed the high peaks until at last she came to the rivers of night. In those dark waters she swam, fending off shades and elder things that the gods had cast there, till at last she came to the secret harbour where the Sun rested during the night.

She put the Sun in her bag that could hold anything and then stole forth, back across the mountains.

All the world was silent as she returned to her love’s hall. No birds sung, no horns sounded. The sky was dark and there were no stars.

Within, her love lay in endless, dreamless sleep.


Word Count: 150

This is for Flash Fiction for Aspiring Writers. Thanks to Priceless Joy for running the challenge and Goroyboy for providing the prompt photo!

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Adisa was the most beautiful woman in the world. Her eyes were as dark oceans, her skin as polished jet. For her, princes went down on their knees in worship, yet she turned them all away.

One was not to be refused. He was Azutan, sorcerer of the west, who held ten demons in rings. Azutan forced her to wed him, though she wept all through the ceremony.

Life in Azutan’s palace was bitter, though all the halls were full of diamonds and each meal was as a king’s feast day. One day, she saw out the window the laborer Obi, his bare back lashed red, and fell in love, swift as a bird struck with an arrow.

In secret the lovers met under moon and stars. Yet one night Azutan followed her and saw them embrace.

“A curse upon you, Obi,” he snarled, and twisted one of his rings. “You shall stand forever before her window, always seen and never had.”

Obi’s flesh turned to cold grey, spreading from his fingertips to his wide eyes.

“No,” Adisa vowed. “You shall not part my love from me.”

She pressed her lips to his and froze there, never to move again.


Word Count: 200

This is for Sunday Photo Fiction. Photo credit to Eric Witlund.

When Geoff had found out Kenton had used his money to buy them an office, the only thing that had kept him from strangling him was his wife holding him back, but when they arrived at the location, he had to admit it didn’t look bad.

“And how much did you say it cost?”

Kenton told him, with a smug smile.

“There has to be a catch.”

“Well…”

Opening the door, Geoff looked inside. And outside.

“There’s no back wall.”

Kenton shrugged. “What do you need a back wall for, really?”

That time, there was nobody to hold Geoff back.

derelict-building-sandra-crook


Word Count: 100

This is for Friday Fictioneers. Thanks to Rochelle Wisoff-Fields for running the challenge and Sandra Cook for providing the prompt photo!

tltweek104

She sat on the roof of the old house, looking up at the constellations that danced in the dark blue sky over the crest of the hills. The baying of hounds came ever closer, accompanied by the glow of torches and the roar of the mob.

“Forgive them,” she whispered to the stars and closed her eyes as the flames began to climb.


This is for Three Line Tales. Thanks to Sonya for running the challenge and Thomas Shellberg for providing the prompt photo!

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The cart was stopped on the way out of the town gates by two of the Sheriff’s guard. They were usual sort he hired: tall, muscular, with the unpleasant sort of expressions that suggested a childhood hobby of strangling kittens.

“Get out,” the first man snarled at the cart driver.

“What is this?”

“There’s a prisoner on the loose. And that…” He pointed to the bag of the cart, hidden under a canvas sheet. “Seems like a good place for him to hide.”

 

They tore the canvas from the top of the cart. Underneath were large, heavy logs, felled in Sherwood.

The second guard sighed. “On your way.”

When the cart had passed out of sight of the walls, the driver pulled over. The secret panel in the hollow log lifted and familiar laughter rang out like a rooster’s crow.

Once more, Robin Hood had slipped through the Sheriff’s fingers.


Word Count: 150

This is for Flash Fiction for Aspiring Writers. Thanks to Priceless Joy for running the challenge and Fandango for providing the prompt photo!