Posts Tagged ‘review’

Welcome to the Living Authors’ Society Doctor Who Discussions, where the arguments are made up and the scores don’t matter. Join J.A. Prentice and Jaden C. Kilmer in our look at the latest Doctor Who episode: Oxygen by Jamie Mathieson.

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There are SPOILERS past this point. And believe me, this episode had a big one, so consider yourselves warned.

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Knock Knock
Welcome to another Doctor Who Discussion with Jaden C. Kilmer and J.A. Prentice. This week, we’ll be reviewing Knock Knock. Join as we use our little grey cells to examine and debate the latest episode of Doctor Who, written by Mike Bartlett and guest-starring the brilliant David Suchet!
Be Warned: There are SPOILERS below the tag!

 

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Welcome to Living Authors’ Society‘s (ir)regularly scheduled Doctor Who Discussion! Join J.A. Prentice (JA) and Jaden C. Kilmer (JC) as they try to determine if this week’s Doctor Who, Smile by Frank Cottrell-Boyce, gets a 🙂 or a 😦.
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Be warned, there are Spoilers past this point. Read at your own risk.

landscape-1492185026-12919221-low-res-doctor-who-s10And here we are, with a new episode of Doctor Who. Not an appearance on Class, not a solitary Christmas special, but a real, genuine first episode of a new series. It’s enough to get anyone a little emotionally.
It is with pride that we present this Discussion, wherein Jaden C. Kilmer (JC) and J.A. Prentice (JA) talk about a great many things, including, on occasion, the episode they’re supposed to be discussing.
Be warned. Ahead lurk spoilers – nasty, slippery, shadowy things with siren calls – for The Pilot. (And not the one with Hartnell.) Proceed at your own risk.
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Oscar nominations are in, and we like a lot of what the Academy has chosen to honor. Eight nominations for Arrival?  Love it. Kubo and the Two Strings with a nomination for visual effects? Unprecedented. Fantastic. Finding Dory not given a cursory nomination just because it’s Pixar? Great.

And then we get to the original screenplay award…

The Lobster has been nominated.

This one nomination is so confounding, so absolutely nonsensical, so objectively incorrect, that it’s enough for us (well, me) to say “fuck it, the Oscars have lost their minds! We’ll do our own one! With Blackjack! and Hookers!”

If you haven’t seen this pathetic film-equivalent of canine excrement then here’s a basic summary of the “script.”

The first half is an absurdist black comedy loosely satirizing modern dating culture. It’s not particularly funny or witty, but it at least has a clear focus and tone.

Half way through, it turns into a dystopian guerilla war story, completely forgetting its own premise, plot, and purpose.

What goes into a story? Particularly something you could classify as genre fiction?

You need a premise, for one. The premise of The Lobster is that in the future single men and women go to a sort of resort where they must find a suitable mate in the most objective, emotionless way possible. This premise ends up having nothing to do with the way the plot unfolds.

A story needs to have stakes. In The Lobster, if you don’t find a suitable mate, you are turned into an animal. However this fate is never shown after the opening minutes and, again, the second half of the movie forgets about the stakes it previously set. When stories ignore the stakes that they’ve set up like this they lose any sense of tension, because the audience doesn’t feel a threat.

A story needs an arc. The Lobster has two halves that are entirely incongruent with each other in tone, plot, and purpose. The (thin, weak, unfunny) satire of the first half disappears and the movie is no longer about what it thinks its about. There’s multiple themes that are set up and dropped. It’s really about nothing, actually. And you can make stories about nothing as long as the characters are good (Seinfeld anyone?) but that brings me to…

The characters are all purposely dull. In some pretentious delusion, the writers thought that having none of the characters of the story showing any emotion was some sort of genius satirization giving insight into the modern dating world. Newsflash: Ask any young person and they’ll tell you the issue with dating is that it’s all feeling, no thinking. Maybe  the writers of The Lobster thought it would be hilarious to satirize something by doing the opposite? In which case isn’t that not satire?

A script so objectively horrendous, one that obeys no convention of writing and does nothing to justify why it broke them, getting nominated for best screenplay only has one explanation. This script is so bad that the Academy must’ve thought that they were just missing something, too dumb and simple to comprehend the certain genius they’ve just sat through. Therefore, in a desperate effort to appear like the high-brow snobs they want to be, they nominated this horseshit. They might even let it win.

Your opinion is invalid! I reject your ceremony, and substitute my own!

Welcome to this, our latest and possibly final Sherlock discussion. (Please don’t be final.) Join Jaden C. Kilmer (JC) and J.A. Prentice (JA) as we examine The Final Problem, which was sadly afflicted by Russian hackers, who tried to ruin this like they did certain other things. sherlock-the-final-problem

Spoilers lurk ahead. Be wary.

Thrill to discover which of us is wrongLaugh at the wit! Cringe at my attempt to poorly ape classic movie posters! Read on for our thoughts!

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Welcome once more to our Sherlock Discussion, featuring J.A. Prentice (JA), who is Right, and Jaden C. Kilmer (JC),  who is Wrong. Coincidentally, J.A. Prentice is writing up the blog post as well as being objectively right about all things ever.
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Read on for our debate about the merits of Moffat’s latest episode, “The Lying Detective!” Be warned: there are SPOILERS afoot.

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